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abhishekshuklaseo
Oct 07, 2021
In General Discussions
What are the different types of drug addiction treatments? There are numerous options for treating drug addiction that have proven to be effective, including: Long-term follow-up to prevent relapse includes behavioural counselling, medication, medical devices, and applications used to treat withdrawal symptoms or deliver skills training, as well as evaluation and treatment for co-occurring mental health issues such as depression and anxiety. A wide range of care, including a customised treatment plan and follow-up options, can be critical to success. As needed, treatment should include both medical and mental health services. Community- or family-based recovery support systems may be used as part of the follow-up care. Important links: Rehab Centers West Palm Beach Rehab Fort Lauderdale Rehab How are medications and devices used in the treatment of drug addiction? Medications and devices can be used to treat withdrawal symptoms, avoid relapse, and treat co-occurring conditions. Withdrawal. Medications and devices can aid in the suppression of withdrawal symptoms during the detoxification process. Detoxification is not "treatment" in and of itself, but rather the first step in the process. Patients who do not receive further treatment after detoxification typically resume drug use. According to one study of treatment facilities, medications were used in nearly 80% of detoxifications (SAMHSA, 2014). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted a new indication to an electronic stimulation device, NSS-2 Bridge, in November 2017 for use in helping to reduce opioid withdrawal symptoms. This device, which is worn behind the ear, sends electrical pulses to stimulate specific brain nerves. In addition, the FDA approved lofexidine, a non-opioid medicine designed to alleviate opioid withdrawal symptoms, in May 2018. Prevention of relapse. Medication can help patients re-establish normal brain function and reduce cravings. There are medications available to treat opioid (heroin, prescription pain reliever) addiction, as well as tobacco (nicotine) and alcohol addiction. Other medications are being developed by scientists to treat stimulant (cocaine, methamphetamine) and cannabis (marijuana) addiction. People who use multiple drugs, which is very common, require treatment for all of the substances they use. To treat opioid addiction, methadone (Dolophine®, Methadose®), buprenorphine (Suboxone®, Subutex®, Probuphine®, SublocadeTM), and naltrexone (Vivitrol®) are used. Methadone and buprenorphine suppress withdrawal symptoms and relieve cravings by acting on the same brain targets as heroin and morphine. Naltrexone works by blocking the effects of opioids at their receptor sites in the brain and should only be used in patients who have already been detoxed. All medications aid patients in reducing drug seeking and related criminal behaviour, as well as in becoming more receptive to behavioural treatments. According to an NIDA study, once treatment is started, both a buprenorphine/naloxone combination and an extended release naltrexone formulation are equally effective in treating opioid addiction. Because full detoxification is required for naloxone treatment, initiating treatment among active users was difficult, but once detoxification was complete, both medications had comparable efficacy. Tobacco: Nicotine replacement therapies come in a variety of forms, including patches, sprays, gum, and lozenges. These items are available without a prescription. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the United States has approved two prescription medications for nicotine addiction: bupropion (Zyban®) and varenicline (Chantix®). They function differently in the brain, but both aid in the prevention of relapse in people attempting to quit smoking. When combined with behavioural treatments such as group and individual therapy, as well as telephone quitlines, the medications are more effective. Alcohol: Three medications have been approved by the FDA to treat alcoholism, and a fourth, topiramate, has shown promise in clinical trials (large-scale studies with people). The three medications that have been approved are as follows: Naltrexone inhibits opioid receptors, which are involved in the rewarding effects of alcohol as well as the craving for alcohol. In some patients, it significantly reduces relapse to heavy drinking. Genetic differences may have an impact on how well the drug works in specific patients. Acamprosate (Campral®) may alleviate long-term withdrawal symptoms such as insomnia, anxiety, restlessness, and dysphoria (generally feeling unwell or unhappy). It could be more effective in patients suffering from severe addiction. Disulfiram (Antabuse®) prevents alcohol from being broken down. Acetaldehyde accumulates in the body, causing unpleasant side effects such as flushing (warmth and redness in the face), nausea, and irregular heartbeat if the patient consumes alcohol. Compliance (taking the medication as prescribed) can be a challenge, but it may benefit patients who are highly motivated to quit drinking. Co-occurring disorders: Other medications are available to treat potential mental health conditions, such as depression or anxiety, that may be contributing to the individual's addiction. Important links: FL Alcohol Treatment Recovery Center Dual Diagnosis Treatment
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abhishekshuklaseo
Oct 07, 2021
In General Discussions
Making the decision to change your relationship with drugs or alcohol is an important first step toward recovery. However, recovery is a process that drug and alcohol rehab programmes can assist you with. Substance abuse treatment options include detoxification, therapy, and counselling. These are divided into two categories: outpatient rehab and inpatient rehab. The type of rehab that is best for you will be determined by your needs and the severity of your substance abuse problem. Outpatient and inpatient rehab will both help you stop using drugs or alcohol and reduce your chances of reusing them after you recover. There is no better or more effective type of rehab than the other. The setting and what works best for you and your personal situation are what distinguishes them. Outpatient Rehabilitation Outpatient rehab entails daily treatment at a clinic or facility, such as therapy, counselling, or group sessions. People who choose outpatient treatment can continue to live at home while recovering, allowing them to care for children or family members, work, and attend school. Outpatient care is typically less expensive than inpatient rehabilitation, but the level of care may be less intensive. Important Links: NJ Rehab Inpatient Rehab Alcoholism Treatment Most programmes include individual or group counselling and employ a step-down approach, which means that sessions become less intensive and frequent as you progress through treatment. These programmes assist patients in overcoming their drug or alcohol addiction and then maintaining their recovery over time. Considerations for Outpatient Treatment Outpatient treatment has several advantages that make it the best option for many people: You can live at home while undergoing treatment. This works if you have a strong support system in your family and friends. When compared to inpatient care, the cost of treatment for outpatients is typically much lower. There are numerous types of counselling and therapy available in this setting; you can select the level of intensity of care that is most appropriate for you. To accommodate work schedules, appointments can be made in the evenings or on weekends. Some outpatient programmes can treat patients who have co-occurring disorders or problems, such as depression, eating disorders, bipolar disorder, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Important Links: CA Rehab California Rehab Addiction center
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abhishekshuklaseo
Oct 07, 2021
In General Discussions
Alcohol withdrawal symptoms occur when a person who has been drinking excessive amounts of alcohol on a regular basis abruptly stops drinking alcohol. Causes Adults are the most likely to experience alcohol withdrawal. However, it can also happen to teenagers or children. The more you drink on a regular basis, the more likely it is that you will experience alcohol withdrawal symptoms when you stop drinking. If you have certain other medical issues, you may experience more severe withdrawal symptoms. Symptoms Collapse Section Symptoms has been expanded. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms usually occur within 8 hours after the last drink, but can occur days later. Symptoms usually peak by 24 to 72 hours, but may go on for weeks. Important links: Alcohol detox Drug detox Addiction treatment Common symptoms include: Anxiety or nervousness Depression Fatigue Irritability Jumpiness or shakiness Mood swings Nightmares Not thinking clearly Other symptoms may include: Sweating, clammy skin Enlarged (dilated) pupils Headache Insomnia (sleeping difficulty) Loss of appetite Nausea and vomiting Pallor Rapid heart rate Sweating, clammy skin Tremor of the hands or other body parts A severe form of alcohol withdrawal called delirium tremens can cause: Agitation Fever Seeing or feeling things that aren't there (hallucinations) Seizures Severe confusion Important links: Rehab West palm beach Residential treatment Recovery center
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